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Information on the Swedish Labour Court’s personal data processing

The Swedish Labour Court is the personal data controller for the processing of personal data that takes place at the court. The court processes personal data for judicial and administrative activities.

If you have provided or will provide information about yourself or if somebody else has provided information about you to the Labour Court, it is important that you read the information below.

If you have questions

If you have questions regarding the Labour Court’s personal data processing, you can tum to the court’s data protection officer.

Information to you as a data subject

According to current regulations regarding data protection, as a data subject, you have the right to receive information on the Swedish Labour Court’s processing of your personal data. Information must also be provided to you regarding the purposes of the processing. Under certain circumstances, personal data can be corrected, supplemented or deleted upon your request. The processing of the data can also be restricted.

In the tabs at left, there are various sections of information depending on what context information about you exists at the court.

You have the right to request a register transcript

You have the right to request to find out if the court is processing personal data that concerns you and if so, to receive the data and information about the processing (known as a register transcript). If you request a register transcript too often, the court may deny your request or charge a reasonable fee for it.

You have the right to request correction, deletion, restriction and objection

If anything is wrong in your personal data, you have the right to request that it be corrected.

You have the right to request deletion of your personal data, make objections to the processing and request restrictions to the data processing. It is good to be aware that these rights are strongly limited during on-going adjudication of a case or matter. The rights are also limited since official documents may only be changed or deleted if there is valid statutory support to do so.

If you request correction, deletion or objection to a processing and request that it be restricted, the court may review if the action you request is to be taken or not.

You have the right to file complaint with the Swedish Data Protection Authority

If you believe that the court has processed your personal data in a manner that conflicts with regulations on the processing of such information, you can turn to the Swedish Data Protection Authority to lodge a complaint. The Swedish Data Protection Authority may not review complaints pertaining to the judicial activities, however.

You can contact the Swedish Data Protection Authority by e-mail at datainspektionen@datainspektionen.se, phone at 08-657 61 00 or with the postal address Datainspektionen, Box 8114, 104 20 Stockholm.

Data protection officer

You can reach the court’s data protection officer by e-mail to kansliet@arbetsdomstolen.se, state “To the data protection officer” in the subject line, or by phone at 08-617 66 00.

Contact information

Swedish Labour Court
Postal address: Box 2018, 103 11 Stockholm
Visiting address: Stora Nygatan 2 A-B
Tel: +46-8-617 66 00, e-mail: kansliet@arbetsdomstolen.se

Personal data in the judicial activities

Why and how are personal data processed?

Personal data is processed by the Swedish Labour Court, as the personal data controller, to be able to adjudicate cases. The court processes your personal data as a part of what is called the exercise of public authority and a task of public interest.

In order for the court to be able to adjudicate the case, you as a party to the case, a member of counsel or an interpreter must provide correct and updated contact information. Beyond this, there is no obligation for you to submit personal data to the court. The court can also obtain contact information for you from other registers. Your contact information can be used at a later date if necessary in another case or matter at the court.

Sound recordings are made in proceedings during statements of facts, hearings and interviews, as well as closing arguments as memos to be able to judge or decide in the case. The recordings are saved until the case is closed. Only the Swedish Labour Court’s personnel and judges who are working with the case have access to the recordings. The recordings are not official documents and as a main rule are not released outside the Labour Court.

Those who may access the personal data are employees and judges at the court and others who need them for the case to be able to be handled, such as counterparties and interpreters. If somebody requests it, your personal data may be released to, for example, private individuals or journalists on condition that the personal data is not covered by confidentiality.

When the case is closed, your personal data will be saved in archives as long as the archive legislation requires.

In order to provide information on the court’s assessments in precedent-setting rulings, so-called indirect personal data (i.e. information that does not contain name or personal ID numbers) are published on the court’s website and in the so-called legal information system. In order to provide information about the court’s activities, indirect personal data is also published in the form of case numbers on the court’s website when it concerns current main proceedings. This is a task of public interest.

If you have questions about what personal data is processed or how it is processed, you can contact the court.

You have the right to request a register transcript

You have the right to request to find out if the court is processing personal data that concerns you and if so, to receive the data and information about the processing (known as a register transcript). If you request a register transcript too often, the court may deny your request or charge a reasonable fee for it.

You have the right to request correction, deletion, restriction and objection

If anything is wrong in your personal data, you have the right to request that it be corrected.

You have the right to request deletion of your personal data, make objections to the processing and request restrictions to the data processing. It is good to be aware that these rights are strongly limited during on-going adjudication of a case or matter. The rights are also limited since official documents may only be changed or deleted if there is valid statutory support to do so.
If you request correction, deletion or objection to a processing and request that it be restricted, the court may review if the action you request is to be taken or not.

You have the right to file complaint with the Swedish Data Protection Authority

If you believe that the court has processed your personal data in a manner that conflicts with regulations on the processing of such information, you can turn to the Swedish Data Protection Authority to lodge a complaint. The Swedish Data Protection Authority may not review complaints pertaining to the judicial activities, however.

You can contact the Swedish Data Protection Authority by e-mail at datainspektionen@datainspektionen.se, phone at 08-657 61 00 or with the postal address Datainspektionen, Box 8114, 104 20 Stockholm.

Data protection officer

You can reach the court’s data protection officer by e-mail to kansliet@arbetsdomstolen.se, state “To the data protection officer” in the subject line, or by phone at 08-617 66 00.

Contact information

Swedish Labour Court
Postal address: Box 2018, 103 11 Stockholm
Visiting address: Stora Nygatan 2 A-B
Tel: +46-8-617 66 00, e-mail: kansliet@arbetsdomstolen.se

Personal data in the administrative activities

Processing of personal data outside the judicial activities

The Labour court may also process personal data outside the judicial activities. The data is then processed in the Labour Court’s administrative systems.

The Labour Court processes personal data to conduct correspondence. This may concern answering inquiries or bookings and orders of goods and services. This is a task of public interest and in some cases a legal obligation.

The vast majority of personal data has been provided to the Labour Court by external submitters, but the Labour Court can also itself obtain, for example, contact information from publicly available sources.

Those who may access the personal data are employees at the court and others who need it for the matter to be able to be handled. If somebody requests it, your personal data may be released to, for example, private individuals or journalists on condition that the personal data is not covered by confidentiality. Your personal data will be processed by the Labour Court as long as necessary and may be subject to archiving as long as the archive legislation requires.

If you ask the Swedish Labour Court a general question

If you provide information about yourself in connection with a question or submission, the information will be processed in the scope of your question or submission, to the extent necessary in order for the Labour Court to be able to handle the matter. Your personal data is then processed as a part of the performance of a task of public interest.

If you request access to official documents

If you provide information about yourself in connection with requesting access to official documents, the information will be processed to the extent necessary in the scope of this request. The Labour Court then processes your personal data as a result of the performance of a legal obligation.

If you book a study visit or want to attend a hearing

If you provide information about yourself in connection with booking a study visit or requesting to attend a hearing, the information will be processed to the extent necessary in the scope of this request. The Labour Court then processes your personal data as a result of the performance of a legal obligation.

If you visit the Labour Court’s hearings

Sound recordings are made during statements of facts, hearings and interviews, as well as closing arguments as memos to be able to judge or decide in the case. The recordings are saved until the case is closed. Only the Swedish Labour Court’s personnel and judges who are working with the case have access to the recordings. The recordings are not official documents and as a main rule are not released outside the Labour Court.

If you seek employment at the Labour Court

If you provide information about yourself in connection with a recruitment process, the information will be processed in the scope of this process and to a necessary extent to handle the
process. The Labour Court then processes your information as a part of its exercise of public authority and as a part of performing task of public interest.

You have the right to request a register transcript

You have the right to request to find out if the court is processing personal data that concerns you and if so, to receive the data and information about the processing (known as a register transcript). If you request a register transcript too often, the court may deny your request or charge a reasonable fee for it.

You have the right to request correction, deletion, restriction and objection

If anything is wrong in your personal data, you have the right to request that it be corrected.

You have the right to request deletion of your personal data, make objections to the processing and request restrictions to the data processing. It is good to be aware that these rights are strongly limited during on-going adjudication of a case or matter. The rights are also limited since official documents may only be changed or deleted if there is valid statutory support to do so.

If you request correction, deletion or objection to a processing and request that it be restricted, the court may review if the action you request is to be taken or not.

You have the right to file complaint with the Swedish Data Protection Authority

If you believe that the court has processed your personal data in a manner that conflicts with regulations on the processing of such information, you can turn to the Swedish Data Protection Authority to lodge a complaint.

You can contact the Swedish Data Protection Authority by e-mail at datainspektionen@datainspektionen.se, phone at 08-657 61 00 or with the postal address Datainspektionen, Box 8114, 104 20 Stockholm.

Data protection officer

You can reach the court’s data protection officer by e-mail to kansliet@arbetsdomstolen.se, state “To the data protection officer” in the subject line, or by phone at 08-617 66 00.

Contact information

Swedish Labour Court
Postal address: Box 2018, 103 11 Stockholm
Visiting address: Stora Nygatan 2 A-B
Tel: +46-8-617 66 00, e-mail: kansliet@arbetsdomstolen.se

St. Nygatan 2 A-B
Box 2018
103 11 STOCKHOLM
Tel. 08-617 66 00